Family life with a child on cancer treatment – Maintenance

A new kind of normal

I’ve had a few people highlight that I haven’t posted in a while, asking after us and how George’s chemotherapy is going, so thought I’d give an update.

The children watching the penguins
The children watching the penguins

Things are normal – our new normal anyway, hence the radio silence.  If you do keep up via the Facebook page or on Twitter you’ll have seen the little life updates from Instagram or when I’ve tagged us in Alder Hey.

We enjoyed our trip down south to visit family in the last school holidays and I survived the “beautiful” singing all the way in the car by the kids.  Whipsnade Zoo was great and it was lovely to spend some time with our family there.  The drive home wasn’t so enjoyable late at night trying to navigate alone.  The kids were sleeping and I was diverted off the M6 TWICE back to Warrington!  Anyway, I lived to tell the tale…

Temperature spike during maintenance

George having his obs done
George having his obs done

The following couple of days we were in and out of Alder Hey as George was poorly.  He’d spiked temperatures and needed intravenous antibiotics through his port, plus the usual blood tests and cultures, snot samples and all that.  Imagine someone sticking a tube up your nose to suck out the snot!  The tests came back showing he had 3 viruses that may linger but the hospital were happy he should be able to fight them off with the white blood count/neutrophils he had.  He’s gradually improved since then and thankfully he was over it by the time he was back in school.

Back to school

We’ve been back at school for a couple of weeks now and had Halloween and Bonfire night in between.  We managed to host our usual Halloween party, that got messy and then hid indoors on the 5th November with Sugar the poo away from the noisy fireworks.

Oliver cross country running
Oliver cross country running

George had a couple of emotional days after the first week back crying in school and crying at the gates saying he just wants to go home with Mummy.  Broke my heart…. but we both sucked it up.  The teachers were as lovely as usual encouraging him and talking about what lovely plans they had that day.  The school office called me as soon as I got home to tell me he’d settled so I didn’t spend the day fretting.

Oliver ran for his school in cross country at Walton Gardens last week and has been enjoying playing basketball.  Harriet’s being graded for her first karate belt next week.  She’s still spending some of her time as her alter ego “The Carrot” or pointing her finger up off her forehead pretending to be a unicorn quite a lot.  I must say the finger doesn’t look like a unicorn horn, it looks more like something else that’s a little unsettling as she trots around the playground.  She is also enjoying signing choir (that’s signing and singing!) and will be involved in a few choirs over the Christmas time.  We’re not sick of the Christmas songs already, honest.

Harriet in her Gi at Karate
Harriet in her Gi at Karate

Christmas play

Damien and I were really pleased with the big reveal of what George is lined up to be in his first school Christmas performance.  One for the family album, that he tells me he chose himself – none other than a Christmas Angel Ballerina!  complete with wings and a tutu.  He’s going to look beautiful!!

Telephone maintenance

We had our first telephone maintenance appointment last week which felt bizarre.  We’d gone in to Oncology Daycare at Alder Hey on the Monday for George to have his gripper removed, as he’d been in with temperatures a couple of times over the previous days.  It had been left in in case it needed accessing again to save him having to keep having the needle into Barry (the port).  While we were there George had his bloods taken so that the Doctor could decide what dose of chemo he should change to if need be on the Wednesday.

The call was pretty straight forward apart from me flapping a little over what numbers go where on the sheet.  Ultimately his dose had stayed the same anyway but I had to mark down the information correctly to prove we’re not morons (or pretend we’re not!) and keep on telephone maintenance! no pressure.

We’re back for more blood tests next Wednesday and George will be going in to be checked over the by the doctor again.

Losing the plot

Walkies Sugar Poo!
Walkies Sugar Poo!

I feel like I’m going a little bit crazy at home now all three kids are in school most of the time.  The dog has more walks than most of the dogs on the street added together! half the dog walkers on the park know my life story and I don’t even know their names.  I must spend a fortune on cake and lunching out because I can’t stand my only purpose being housework and the weekly shop.  I know! I know! I shouldn’t complain, I know i’m lucky to be in this position, but I don’t do “nothing” very well.  I’m angry with myself for not throwing myself into decorating and cooking wonderful meals like a good little wife but it’s dull, and it’s not me.

Before anyone starts – I’m already volunteering at school, getting more involved with the PTA and have been quietly setting up a little business in the background.

The anniversary of when I think George’s health started deteriorating last year is upon us already… it was November 2015 when he first started with temperatures and was having antibiotics for tonsilitis – which is quite common in patients who end up being diagnosed with leukaemia.  I can’t believe how affected I am by the thought of Christmas approaching.  Oh I will be trying my very best to enjoy every last second this year! it’s just hard to not reflect on being in Warrington Hospital last year, and all that we / he went through in the build up to his diagnosis.

Things have been seriously shit since last November, the worst thing our family has ever experienced!  From the amount of time the children were passed from pillar to post and how poorly George was from the side effects of his treatment.  I thought that getting to this point with his treatment working, him being well, his hair growing back, him attending school… no wheelchair, no impaired sight, memory loss or any other problems… the fact that he has started to actually read real words in his little school books and he’s a flippin’ fairy ballerina in the sodding Christmas play! I thought I’d be doing the bloody conga into that school playground!  But I’m not.  I just feel scared it will come back.

The unicorn
The unicorn

It’s not the most positive paragraph to end on for now, the way I feel is going to be fairly common amongst parents in my position and I do keep reminding myself that the chances of relapse are pretty low.  For now, I’m going to continue distracting myself, by mithering my friends for brews, eating cake and walking the dog that has a better social life than me.  If all else fails you might find me trotting around like a mythical creature with a finger-horn or taking on the alter ego of a root vegetable.

Lis x

You can relax now…… erm No!! – choice of language and childhood cancer

George looking very relaxed having a blood test
Laid back Larry having a blood test

Tomorrow, Wednesday 21st September 2016, will be George’s first trip to theatre for a lumbar puncture to give him spinal chemotherapy since he started big boy’s school.  He had to come out of school today to go to Alder Hey for a blood test in case he needs any blood transfusions before tomorrow’s procedure.

I’m sure if it was one of us adults going to theatre under general anaesthetic we’d probably be in bed for the week following, feeling sorry for ourselves.  Providing all goes to plan there’s no doubt that George will be back trotting into school on Thursday.  When I say trotting, I mean, whining for me to carry him in to school because his “legs hurt”, only to spend the day running and riding bikes around with his friends with no pain at all… funny that.

I’m not really nervous about the actual procedure as we all know the drill now, particularly George whose only thoughts are “will I get a present if I stay lying down afterwards?” (this is to prevent the chemotherapy reaching his brain and giving him severe headaches if you remember).  I’m more nervous about his blood test results and where they’re up to.

George has been on reduced chemotherapy for 5-6 weeks now because his neutrophil count isn’t where they want it to be, it’s still quite low.  Neutrophils fight infection and are “good” cells.  He had a bad cough, it reached its peak and has gone now but his neutrophils have still remained low.  He’s borderline severely neutropenic… not that you’d be able to tell by looking at him.  Reduced chemo is not what we want, shite as the side effects can be, we want to feel like he’s on a decent dose to prevent relapse, but then too much chemo is what is likely to knocking his neutrophil count down! you can see the issue here.

We know that relapse whilst on treatment would be quite rare, it’s when he comes off treatment after the 3 years that the chances of it returning increases – makes sense.

I read a lady’s angry rant on a FB support group for parents of children with cancer recently.  This lady was p*ssed off because her child has just finished treatment, and other non-cancer-parents keep saying things like “well at least it’s all over” and making references to being able to relax now.  No.  Folks, be mindful that coming off treatment, depending what type of cancer they’ve had, will be worse for that Mummy or Daddy (or person themselves!) than a lot of their experiences so far – and there will have been some baaaaaaad times believe me.  Yes, their child may no longer experiencing the side effects of chemo, but oh my god, relax!?  I’m sure it was completely innocent comment, people just don’t know what to say.

George still has years of chemotherapy treatment ahead of him.  We have this dodgy blood count which will probably just be nothing, but I’m constantly on pins, looking for a limp, fretting over a temp, worrying when he doesn’t feel like eating his tea or just looks slightly off colour.  The first thing that pops up into your mind is that the leukaemia is back.

George finishes his treatment in the Summer of 2019 all being well.  I hope that, if only the followers of my blog take something from this post, that will be a few more people who will be a little more mindful of the language used when speaking with the parent of a little survivor (or ANY cancer survivor for that matter).   Yes we’ll reach milestones, yes we may now have a new lease of life, we may view the world completely differently.  But we’re not all kicking back and chilling because our child has a full head of hair, or is attending school, or their last dose of chemo has been taken.  The constant fear of relapse is always in the back of our minds, whilst getting on with life, living it to it’s fullest with those we love.

The smug dog
The smug dog

On a lighter note, this week has been a week filled with having places to be and relaxed doggy walks… yeah it doesnt sound like me, the relaxed dog walks that is.  In reality, the dog is currently refusing to walk unless it has canine-company.  I’ve somehow ended up over-socialising my bloody dog as if that’s a thing!!  She already looks like me, now she can’t cope without mates like me!  So we’ve been practising going out without half the dogs in Warrington…  Look at her face on that photo, that’s what I’m dealing with.

Georgie hitching a lift with his big brother
Georgie hitching a lift with his big brother

Kids and school-wise we’ve had 3 lots of homework, we’ve got 3 lots of reading, 2 lots of spellings, basketball training, basketball matches, karate, swimming lessons, art and craft club and running club this week.  That’s around hospital twice for George, shopping and we’re about to start viewing high schools for Oliver… I’m doing my best at empowering the kids, teaching them right from wrong, teaching the dog not to jump up and nip anything that moves or drag its arse along the floor.

Suffice to say it’s Tuesday and the gin/wine/turps is calling me….

Lis x

First day of school Mummy adventures Part II

Lisa Rooza
September 9, 2016

George starting school – a child on chemotherapy

George and his fluffy head
George and his fluffy head

George is starting school tomorrow…. i’ll just let that sink in.

I’ve been cracking on with life like I did when he was diagnosed with leukaemia and burying my head in the sand a little.  Everything’s going to be ok, everything’s fine… I can tell you now, this is going to go one of two ways, i’m either going to be hard faced dropping him off or i’m going to be in bits, with no in between.  Our only saving grace is the fact that he’s just doing an afternoon tomorrow so at least I won’t be in the morning drop off crowd waving him off with Oliver and Harriet.  The rest of the week builds up to a full day then next week, boom, full time education!

This is more than “oh no my baby is leaving me!”, “he’s too young” nerves.  It’s more like “my son is on chemotherapy AND starts school tomorrow” kind of thing… you know the feeling?  No you probably don’t.

I’ve got every faith that his new teacher has got this, she is completely lovely and supportive, the same as the school has been since I had to make the phone call to say “Oliver and Harriet won’t be in today, their little brother has cancer, we’re taking them to Alder Hey”  Now THAT was a shitty day.

No, tomorrow won’t be a shitty one, tomorrow is the next step, the beginning of George’s school life.  It will be slightly different to the other children’s, in that he’s going to spend another 3 years with a suppressed immune system to prevent the “bad cells” coming back.  He has daily chemotherapy, another weekly chemotherapy, blood tests and meetings with his consultant every fortnight and goes to theatre ever 12 weeks for a lumbar puncture and spinal chemotherapy.  Let’s just say, there’ll be no 100% attendance certificate coming his way!

George will be more at risk of infection, and anything like that will mean more “sleepovers” at Alder Hey for IV antibiotics and monitoring too.  He’s going to have to try to maintain a high level of hygiene (he’s 4!?), avoid contact sport because of Barry (his port) and his joints may get sore after physical activities.  Catching anything contagious is unavoidable but we know the school have been on the ball with reminding parents to keep their children off if they’re ill, I mean, puking, the trots, chicken pox – what more could we ask.

The three amigos
The three amigos

Despite all this, we’re looking forward to him getting involved in and enjoying as much of school life as possible, particularly friendship.  Whether he’s reading War and Peace by 6 years old, can do Pythagoras theorem or can sing like a canary… it’s not really what it’s all about in life really is it?  I’m just glad he’s getting to go to bleedin’ school and has a chance to be happy like the rest of the kids from nursery (we miss you Playdays!).

Don’t get me wrong i’ll still post proud as punch photos on Facebook etc when he can draw round his hand at age 12…. that’s because i’m his mum. But whether he’s meeting “age related expectations” at the end of the school year or not is not about to change anything.  We’ve met more than enough families whose children have been taken from them for us to appreciate all of our children just being here.

George and his dody
George and his dody

Since George was a baby and throughout his cancer treatment he’s still always had a dummy (dody we call it) for bed time and when he needed soothing.  He’d always had it, along with his precious scarf comforter.   It was particularly necessary when going through the chemo, needles, anaesthetic and when he has been in pain.

I’d been militant when Oliver and Harriet had dodies when they were little, fretting about their teeth, fretting them being “too big”, or being judged so theirs were banished at the earliest opportunity.  As you can imagine, I hadn’t really give two hoots about the shape of George’s teeth given at one point I worried that cancer might beat him… I certainly did not give a rat’s ass what other people might think.  Like I’ve said before, one of the positive things this awful diagnosis has brought with it, is a whole new perspective… and it’s liberating.

But! actual magical things happened at our house this week… with big boy’s school fast approaching George said he wanted to give his dodies to the baby fairies.  A little door appeared one night in his bedroom and he left his dodies sprinkled with fairy dust outside.  In the morning a fire boat toy had been left in return, a fire boat that George had always wanted!  How did they know?  So George, along with starting primary school has also given away his dodies and has only mentioned them since to tell the story about the fairy door in his bedroom.  The door is still there because the tooth fairy is going to need to get in one day.

So we’ve ironed three sets of uniform, and when I say we, I mean Damien has! well…. I went out buying it all! we’ve tried everything on, got water bottles and PE kits, lunch bags, new haircuts (nearly there George!) and it’ll be baths and an early night tonight.

All ready?
All ready?

On a final note, George has asked nearly every day can he go to school yet. He is totally not arsed!

The Familymoon in all its glory

First day at St Ives Bay
First day at St Ives Bay

The few weeks following becoming Mr and Mrs Rooza have become one of our all time favourite memories.  We’d organised two weeks “Familymoon” in Cornwall with George’s consultant haematologist’s permission.  This wasn’t something i’d ever envisaged being able to do during his intense treatment.

We usually camp but decided we’d make life a little easier not having pitch a tent etc by staying in a caravan.  We’d stayed at St Ives Bay Holiday Park last year with all our friends so knew it had everything we wanted plus this time, a sea view to wake up to in the morning.

View from our caravan
View from our caravan

We packed all of George’s chemotherapy and pain relief, high factor sun cream (you can have this prescribed by the Oncology department for anyone who may find that useful), we knew where the nearest paediatric unit was and then where the nearest Oncology unit was too.

Choosing to have “Barry”, the port under the skin, was proving it’s worth as we didn’t have to worry about keeping a line clean, away from sand, sea etc.  George was able to enjoy the beach as much as his brother and sister, we’re still finding sand in his ears now to prove it.  Another thing that was also really helpful was our pop up beach shelter, twenty quid of Amazon.  Sometimes all the running around would be just too much, so it was great for George to be able to crash out of the sun (or typically for the UK, was perfect to get under when it rained!).

The dune of doom
The dune of doom

Hayle Beach was as beautiful as we remembered, the kids enjoyed boarding down the dunes, building sandcastles and paddling in the shallows.  Picnics on the beach each day made saved us a fortune and a couple of beers whilst we were down there made the honeymoon with 3 kids a little more relaxing!

Oliver is less of a paddling in the shallows man, and more of a bodyboarding in the waves kind of guy.  Damien and Oliver boarded most days whilst I watched excitedly…. or maybe I sunbathed….

Oliver bodyboarding
Oliver bodyboarding

Obviously it poured down on a couple of days, we had to be reminded that this was not the Mediterranean cruise we booked.  Being surrounded by sunburnt Northerners wasn’t enough no, some classic Warrington rain was sent our way as a cursory reminder to appreciate the sunny days.

 

Harriet and "Catherine"
Harriet and “Catherine”

What we saved on eating sandy butties on the beach each day, we basically paid the arcades’ overheads for them to remain open until next season.  Harriet spent about fifteen quid “winning” her Catherine and Claire teddies which I suspect had been in the site’s gift shop since the names Catherine and Claire were trendy for young children.  Oliver spent most of his time being a lurker, waiting for some poor kid is robbed of their last 2p at the 2p machine… only to jump straight on and make a killing – and what shall we do with 48p’s worth of 2p’s? let’s put them all back in again!  Georgie was happy squirting water at duckies or just blatantly buying sweets with his spends and gorging on them.

 

Paradise Park
Paradise Park

On another grim weather day we donned our cagoules and hit the local bird of prey sanctuary, Paradise Park, and was pleasantly surprised.  It helps that Harriet absolutely loves birds.  We avoided taking George into the aviary where Oliver and Harriet fed little parakeet thingies, not only because it’s like a scene from “The Birds” and he’d probably freak out but just in case there was anything that would make him ill.  The kids met penguins, owls and there were even flamingos walking about – beats the seagulls as big as dogs that we were used to back at the campsite!

Kite flying
Kite flying

The children flew kites and the big boys enjoyed the surf on the very windy days.  Harriet would run like a maniac in the wind and George and I would cuddle up and appreciate our windbreak and beach tent.

We changed it up with some rock pooling at Godrevy on the first week, it wasn’t as successful as last year but just as much of an adventure.

Rockpooling
Rockpooling

Oliver and Harriet liked running around the rocks and coves while the tide was out and splashing in the clear pools while George would sit with his little net in a rockpool “fishing” like a gnome.  Some standard wave jumping as the tide came back in violently before we did the five minute drive back to our site for some tea.

One beautiful evening we walked up to the top of the dunes to watch the sunset with a picnic blanket and a bottle of champagne and glasses.  The sky was perfect, it was lovely and still and the ocean was calm.  We opened the bottle, let out a little cheer, sipped the froth from the chilled bubbly then promptly had to help Harriet squat in bushes while she went for a p*ss.  The kids ran around kicking sand at us, George screamed when he didn’t get his own way and Oliver went missing.  You can imagine…. but of course we smiled for the camera anyway and pretended it was hours of romantic bliss rather than the 7 minutes approx.

 

It wasn’t quite a Royal Carribean Cruise but we did manage to book ourselves on a Mermaid Pleasure Trip in Penzance.  The skipper was lovely, he let the children drive the boat, they pulled lobster pots, we saw seals at Seal Cove and got to see St Michaels Mount from the water.  What made the day extra special though was the small pod of dolphins that came swimming along side us… The guys on board put a device under the water with a speaker which allowed to listen to the sounds of the dolphins communicating, it was so special and absolutely made our day.

The skipper chatted to George and found out his love of the emergency services.  He kindly arranged for us to visit RNLI Penlee Lifeboat station in Newlyn a few days later for us to go aboard their Ivan Ellen lifeboat.  Coxwain Patch Harvey, was lovely, taking time to chat to the children about the boat, how it rights itself in 3 seconds if it ever overturns!? showing us the engine room and letting the children sit up at the bridge… it was humbling to learn how many of the local fishermen and people in the community run the lifeboat station voluntarily!? and are on call night and day in shifts… what amazing guys taking time out to help people, risking their own lives, so selfless.

We crabbed in Penzance too but spent most of our time seagull dodging and came away stinking of the bait.  Kids enjoyed catching seaweed though!

The second week of our holiday got even better when our good friends arrived with their children!  not only was it fresh faces for the kids to play with but there’s only so much of my crap Damo can listen to.  The kids were so happy to see each other and it was nice to have a wine buddy for after we’d hit the waves 🙂

There was more dune surfing, fits of laughter, beautiful sunsets, shooting stars and a day trip to Falmouth where we got to see the Red Arrows display! George spent most of it with his hands over his ears as usual.

The holiday was perfect and just what we needed, with the comfort of still being in the UK for George’s sake but still magical and memorable.

This evening George is in hospital with Daddy being checked as he’s spiked a temp for a second time since we’ve been back.  We’ve been in for a consultant appointment twice too to have his chemotherapy altered as his white blood count isn’t recovering quite as fast as we’d like.  The doctors aren’t concerned and feel he has a lingering virus (he’s had a bad cough for 3 weeks now) so have reduced his chemo to allow his own body to work it’s magic.

Georges wisps of hair
Georges wisps of hair

George’s next consultant appointment is on his first week at big boys school! I can’t believe we’re at this point already, it was something I couldn’t even compute not so long ago. His first day is going to be particularly poignant in this house, I’m sad he’s not going to be my little buddy at home any more, I’m worried for him like all the other parent’s will be for their babies… but he shouldn’t be having to undergo treatment for cancer, it’s not fair.

We’re hoping the next few years of maintenance will be kind to George and that we can continue to have more happy times as a family than difficult ones.  We’re made up we got out 2 weeks familymoon and for now we’re enjoying the last days of the holidays at home together around hospital trips and preparing for all three children going to school… looks like George might even have some wisps of hair for his first day too!

xx

 

Positive times in hospital, friendships and hair cuts!

An hour after theatre
An hour after theatre

This week George was in Alder Hey Children’s Hospital for the first of his theatre trips of the Maintenance phase of his treatment.  He was in having intrathecal chemotherapy which is chemo via lumbar puncture into his spinal cord.  This is what he’ll have every 12 weeks for the next few years as part of his treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.

I shared a video via our Facebook page of him playing and trotting around 3B Day Care whilst playing with his little aeroplane that he’d chosen from the “bravery box”.  He’d been nil by mouth since the night before and wasn’t able to have a drink, he’d been cool-as having Barry, his port, accessed, and was waiting at that point to be called to the theatre waiting room.  Had it been me waiting to go to theatre in his circumstances, I’d have probably had my head in my hands and no saliva left!

It was quite a poignant moment for us, given 6 months ago we’d only just learnt of George’s leukaemia diagnosis and knew little of what lay ahead.  All those times George would have completely had enough, crying and kicking off, but the poking and prodding had to continue.  The stress of administering anaesthetic , pre-meds to calm him, having to stay lay flat after theatre for an HOUR!… the lovely staff (and other parents) trying to reassure us that one day, he’d be ok with it and that they’d seen it all before.  I couldn’t ever believe that any of it would be “normal” as I avoided eye contact with people for fear of I, myself, having a melt down too…

Giggles waiting for theatre
Giggles waiting for theatre

Now look where we are, I know it’s not always going to be completely smooth but George is so happy to go to hospital.  Everyone knows who he is and shouts his name as they walk past while King George gives them the royal wave.  He knows the drill, he loves the nurses, he plays with their equipment and says he wants to be a doctor.

When George was first diagnosed there was another family on the ward with us whose daughter had also only recently been diagnosed with ALL (Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia).  Their little girl was experiencing some rough side effects and I remember talking to them and being so frightened about the future.  The thought of being in maintenance and things being more straightforward seemed ridiculous to even consider.

On Wednesday when George was in hospital for a blood test, we spoke to Piper and her mum, we were laughing, smiling and celebrating as they’ve also moved into maintenance…. I’m sure there was even some running man dancing.  I remember looking at people like us, just after George’s diagnosis, when things were hard, and thinking how could possibly be laughing!?  it’s funny how things change.

Nice gift to wake up to
Nice gift to wake up to

On Thursday, I also popped in to visit little Theo’s mummy, he has been in hospital, in isolation, for months so thought she might fancy a Costa.  I couldn’t stick around as I was waiting to be called to get George from recovery but his lovely Mummy passed me a gift for George’s birthday.  He enjoyed opening it once he’d come round, thank you so much Natalie – what a thoughtful gesture, he’s worn his George Pig top this weekend.

People reading this may remember Theo is a 2 year old from Warrington whose family and friends are fundraising to get him to the USA for treatment.  You can read more about this and/or donate here.

We were also sat with Erin (the little girl we’ve met who has benefit from a Little Princess Trust wig) on Wednesday and she was in theatre at the same time on Thursday too.  It was nice to chat with her mum and to hopefully be able offer her some comfort as we move forward as Erin was diagnosed more recently.  I told her about the 19 young girls from our children’s school and the locality, that her photo inspired to donate their hair to The Little Princess Trust.  Erin and her mum thinks it’s fantastic!

Some of the girls have already had their hair cut and are looking great 🙂 as is the fundraising! we’ve smashed the target and not even half of the girls have had their hair cut yet.  We have the local newspaper coming to photograph our little heroes all together this week once they’re done.  Harriet’s hair chop is this Tuesday, she can’t wait.

I overheard her in the bath with George earlier talking about how he’s lucky he doesn’t have to wash his hair at the moment.  She’s so lovely though, she told him not to worry though because it’s going to come back one day.  She also sat telling him that she’s having hers cut off for little girls like him this week.  Harriet she wants to make them feel happy again – my heart could burst with pride.

Oliver basketballAnother proud Mum moment was Saturday when l got to watch Oliver play in his first basketball match for The Eagles.  He was great, given he’d never played before, he charged straight in without hesitation amongst the opposition.  The other team had quite a few high level players but that didn’t phase him at all, he kept getting the ball and generally made the game more difficult for them.  It’s great he’s got something for himself that myself and his dad can take him out to. He was too cool for school not posing for a photo!

Taking his brother and sister out!
Taking his brother and sister out!

George was absolutely made up this week as well – Thank you to our lovely neighbours, the Tsangs, and their family for George’s really generous gift.  The family had done some fundraising through their business and all put in to buy George a battery operated digger, some big Lego storage containers in the shape of Lego of course and a fire engine tent.  He’s one very lucky boy to have you all as friends, as am I.

It’s the end of school year this week coming for Oliver and Harriet, a bit of an emotional one for Harriet as well with her teacher leaving.  We have George’s graduation tomorrow and a visit from George’s teacher.  I can’t believe we won’t have the comfort blanket of Playdays anymore 🙁 gifts for the teachers just don’t seem enough to signify how much they all mean to George and us as a family.  I’ve looked through George’s keyworker file that details his journey since he started there.  It’s really sad to see the photos from last year when he’s quite obviously poorly but we didn’t realise.  Then the photos as he changes throughout his cancer treatment, i’m so glad we kept up with attending preschool, I wouldn’t have felt as confident as I do now about him starting school without them.

Prepare for an emotional post as we get the kids sorted for school this coming September!

So we’ve got lots going on, we’re excited for what the summer will bring and feel elated to be able actually make plans to get away for a break in the UK.

Lis x